When You Deal with Mental Depression

There are many people who feel there’s something wrong with their life but couldn’t really find what’s the problem. People who seem like have everything from good job with big salary, family, and even able to live large but still they feel really lonely and stuck. That kind of situation could be a sign of mental depression and when it isn’t treated right, it will become worse.

The problem may not be your body but it is about you mind. Stressful work environment or traumatic experiences may occupy your mind and it creates negative emotional impacts. You need to find help to treat this condition. However, it is understandable that you are reluctant to get a get treatment from psychiatrist because you don’t want other to think you’re a crazy one. Mindfulness therapy can be the alternative and John Nolan could be the one who can help you. He is a life coach and also a qualified Havening Therapist. He is well trained and well experienced with Havening Technique, a mindfulness therapy method to help manage excessive stress and traumatic experiences. This therapy is widely used to treat anxiety, depression, and mental stress with very promising result.

You can this Havening Sheffield practitioner at Mindfulness Mavericks, a mindfulness learning center in this city. John is passionate to help his patient and willing to make sure each patient gets a personalized treatment plan. The Havening treatment will be including one on one talking, visualization, as well as therapeutic touches based on Having Techniques. The patient can also learn the techniques for self-help purpose. Don’t let yourself fall into depression for too long. You are more than deserve to enjoy the fullest of life. Call John Nolan and schedule a session with him. It’s time to address your mental problem and learn how to control negative emotional impact.

Healthcare Staffing Companies Poised For Growth Amid Nursing Shortage

The United States is currently facing a healthcare staffing crisis, based primarily in a shortage of nurses. There is a growing need for nurses, especially travel nurses, and the problem is anticipated to become more acute in the next year. Since 2006, patients have won significant settlements from hospitals for negligence due to nursing shortage, and as the cost of hiring too few nurses comes to outweigh the cost of adequately employing, healthcare staffing companies should have definite growth.

People who feared that healthcare staffing would slow in today’s shaky economy and sold their shares in such companies now regret the decision, as these businesses have jumped in value. Shares of several companies providing travel nurses and temporary physicians initially fell due to fear in our current recession, but have since rebounded sharply.

According to BMO Capital Markets analyst Jeffrey Silber, “an aging population and advances in medical technology should drive demand, while supply may be constrained as caregivers age with few replacements coming through the pipeline. This should bode well for healthcare staffing supplier stocks.”

Silber estimated a travel-nurse staffing revenue of $2.5 billion annually, which is 21 percent of total healthcare staffing revenue. The growth forecast for travel nurses is set particularly slow as tough times push people towards stable jobs at home. He also pointed out that growth in the travel-nursing segment is estimated at 3.5 percent in 2009, compared with 8 percent in 2006.

This has not, however, affected many healthcare staffing companies. For hospitals to even maintain current (depleted) numbers of nurses, they must continue to hire new nurses on a regular basis. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the median age of registered nurses (RNs) was 45 years in 2007. Also, another study reported that a third of all current nurses plan to leave their job within the next year.

Furthermore, staffing companies specializing in travel nurses are expected to continue to do well financially because of the nature of the job of travel nurse. These healthcare workers are employed by hospitals from around one to four months, so staffing companies increase their profit margins because of the rise in billed rates.

Risky Business – Self-Insurance, Healthcare Trusts Gain Favor

Ford hasn’t always had the best relationship with the United Autoworkers Union (UAW). Back in 2007, the company’s employee healthcare costs were eating up the carmaker’s meager profits. After posting quarter after quarter of disappointing earnings, stockholders were putting the big squeeze on America’s pioneer of the modern automobile. That was before economists noticed (or perhaps, acknowledged) that sub-prime mortgages were a bad thing.

To dig out from under its messy employee obligation to provide ongoing, long-term healthcare to its retirees, Ford reluctantly agreed to begin depositing cash into a trust fund that would be administered and operated by UAW once $6.5 billion piles up. By New Years’ Day, Ford had not only met the monetary benchmark, but exceeded it by another half-mil.

“The transfer of these health care liabilities to the VEBA trust is the culmination of several years of work and will significantly improve our competitiveness in the United States,” Ford CFO Lewis Booth said in a statement. “We also have shown confidence in our liquidity…by pre-paying $500 million of debt.”

At the time the arrangement was made, Ford’s public tone was far less positive when it came to its future outlook. Its cars were considered tired, quality suffered and continuous public spats between Henry Ford’s great grandchildren (who held controlling public interest and managed the company) and the stockholders were routinely covered in national headlines. Now the company has not only rebounded, refusing to accept any part of a public government bailout that its peers would later have to extend payment on, but Ford has become a trend-setter in automotive design. Can industry analysts expect the automaker to extend its leadership into the boardrooms of health insurers as well?

When a company or large organization becomes a self-insured entity, the company is assumed to have amassed enough financial liquidity to assume its own risk and the financial risk associated with its employees’ health insurance. In Ford’s case, the company accepted responsibility for its retiree’s healthcare in a long-term buy-out agreement so management could reduce its workforce quickly and stave off continued losses.

Traditionally, only public / government businesses had the financial pull and employee base to justify funding its own health insurance plan. But as planned federal healthcare reforms become law, self-insurance may be more common among smaller corporations and those not typically self-insured today. That’s because one of the most controversial provisions in the Senate’s health reform plan provides for broad new taxes on commercial insurance companies.